Cases and Supporting Documents

  • “United States v. Accord Ship Management PVT. Ltd./Nicanor Jumalo
    3:07-CR-00390, 00398

Senior crew members ordered subordinate crew members on the Indian vessel M/V Sportsqueen (12,666 gross ton cargo vessel) to discharge oil-contaminated ballast water into the ocean by a number of methods, including the use of pies attached to deck vents of the ballast tank.

Crew members were also ordered to attach one end of a hose to the outlet of the bilge pump and the other end to the overboard valve of the Oil Water Separator (“OWS”) to discharge oily sludge directly into the ocean. Defendants also failed to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book and made several false entries regarding the the OWS and incinerator in order to conceal illegal discharges.

Award: Accord will pay a criminal fine of $1.75 million and serve a three year term of probation during which time all of the ships in its fleet will be banned from United States waters and ports. The judge ordered a $250,000 reward be paid to five whistleblowers who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Aegean Shipping Management SA
    2:16-cr-00551 (2016)

Three whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded a total of $500,000. Crewmen reported failure to maintain an accurate oil record book, unauthorized discharge of the bilge holding tank, and oily water separator violations.

  • United States v. Aksay Denizcilik Ve Ticaret A.S.
    8:10-CR-00116

Defendants, operators of the 9,544 gross ton M/T Kerim ship, pled guilty to the failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book and making a false statement. Crew members, acting on behalf of the Defendant, installed a bypass pipe to fit between the sludge discharge line and the blow down value and deliberately dumped oily sludge into the see without passing through the Oily Water Separator.

Defendant had to pay a $725,000 penalty of which a $250,000 reward was paid to two motormen whistleblowers who reported the violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. AML Ship Management GMBH
    15-cr-00007 (2015)

Defendant is the operator of the M/V City of Tokyo, a 42.047 gross tons vehicle carrier. Defendants pled guilty to violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and the Clean Water Act, <span”>33 U.S.C. § l3l9(c)(2)(A) and 33 U.S.C. § l32l(bX3). Defendants were sentenced to 3 years probation, a fine of $375,000, and a community service payment of $125,000. A $150,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower that reported the illegal dumping of oily bilge water into the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone off the coast of Alaska and Oregon.

  • United States v. Aquarosa Shipping A/S
    1:11-cr-00671 (2011)

One whistleblower who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships was rewarded $462,500. The same whistleblower received a $87,500 reward in United States v. Efploia Shipping.

  • United States v. Atlas Ship Management Ltd.
    8:2010-cr-00363

The M/V Avenue Star, a 10,965 ton ship, was owned by Defendants who operated it for commercial purposes.

In 2009, engineering officers and other crew members installed a bypass hose to bypass the Oil Water Separator to pump unfiltered pollution directly into the sea. These crew members also failed to keep an accurate Oil Record Book of the illegal dumping of oily water overboard. Defendants pled guilty to one count of failure to maintain an accurate record book and one count of making a false statement.

Defendants had to pay a $800,000 fine and $100,000 to community service restitution to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. A $250,000 reward was paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. BNavi Ship Management Services
    4:08-CR-00032, 00033

Defendant is an Italian company who operated the M/V Windsor Castle, a 30,000 gross ton ship, pled guilty to violating the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships and making a false statement.

The crew knowingly failed to maintain an accurate record book. Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea without passing the waste through the Oily Water Separator. A $300,000 reward was paid to six crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Botelho Shipping, et al
    3:03-cr-00506

The Fairmont Shipping Ltd., was charged with violations of oil pollution prevention regulations. A $225,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Boyang (Busan) Ltd.
    05-cr-00035 (2005)

Defendants pled guilty to three counts of failure to maintain an accurate oil record book. Defendants were sentenced to a 5 year probation and fined $1,500,000 with additional terms for criminal monetary penalties. A $250,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Calypso Maritime Corporation
    3:07-CR-05412

Defendants owned and operated the M/V Tina M, a 35,063 gross ton ship, and failed to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book detailing the dumping of oily water overboard.

Crew members attempted to conceal the area where a bypass pipe was installed to bypass the Oil Water Separator and dump illegally into the ocean. Defendants pled guilty to knowingly making a false statement and violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Defendants had to pay a $1,000,000 penalty. A $250,000 reward was paid to an engineer and a ship oiler who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Whistleblowers disclosure to authorities the ship board practice of bypassing required oil pollution prevention equipment and discharging oily waste directly into the ocean as well their use of a bypass pipe on numerous occasions over an extended period. In addition, independently verifying that the Chief Engineer directed the illegal discharge activity.

  • United States v. Carbofin
    8:14-cr-00500

Carbofin is an Italian company who own and operate commercial liquefied petroleum gas vessels, including the M/T Marigola, a 12,500 gross ton ship. Crew members on the M/T Margola showed the U.S. Coast Guard during an inspection cell phone video of a bypass hose that appeared to contain a black oily substance. The Coast Guard determined that the hose was connected to the bilge tank and boiler blow down overboard discharge valve (typically to discharge hot water, steam, and alkaline) to illegally dump oily sludge. Defendant Carbofin pled guilty for failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book. Defendant had to pay a $2,150,000 penalty and $600,000 to the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation for use in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Four Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $1,075,000. Various crewmen reported Oily Water Separator violations and false oil record book.

Defendants Casilda Shipping, Ltd., a Greek company that owns the Rio Gold, a 23,000 ton ocean-going cargo ship, pled guilty and sentenced to a three-year term of probation for ordering crew members to illegally bypass the Oil Water Separator to discharge oily waste overboard;

discharge two large plastic barrels, one filled with oil sludge and the other filled with hydrochloric acid. Defendants also falsified the Oil Record Book to conceal these activities.

Defendants must pay a $750,000 fine, $250,000 of which will be paid to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for use in projects to restore the Northern California coast. A $250,000 Reward paid to four crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Ciner Gemi Acente Isletni Sanayi Ve Ticaret S.A.
    1:15-CR-00610, 00616-00617

Defendant Ciner Gemi Acente Isletni Sanayi Ve Ticaret S.A. is a Turkish company and owner and operator of the M/V Artvin, a 44,635 gross ton cargo vessel, pled guilty to two counts of knowingly failed to maintain an accurate in the District of Maryland and Virginia. Defendant had to pay a $900,800 penalty and $150,000 community service penalty. Crew members were directed to drain oily water from the Waste Oil Tank to buckets and/or absorb the oil from the contents of the buckets using a scoop and rags, and then discharge the remaining contents overboard. Other times crew members would connect a hose from a 55-gallon drum containing oily sludge and discharge the contents overboard. The dumping of oil overboard was not recorded in the Oil Record Book. A $250,000 reward was paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Cleopatra Shipping Agency, Ltd.
    3:12-cr-00102

Defendants own the M/V Stellar Wind, a Liberia registered bulk carrier weighing 22,000 gross tons. Defendants illegally discharged oily bilge water into the Mississippi River in Louisiana. Defendants pled guilty to failing to maintain an accurate record book and was sentenced to three years probation and a fine of $300,000. A $150,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower.

  • United States v. Clipper Marine Services
    2:07-cr-00264

Defendant Clipper Marine Services pled guilty to conspiracy to defraud the United States, violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships, and false documents for violations of dumping oily waste overboard that occurred on the M/V Trojan in February 2006.

Six Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $650,000.Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record book.

  • United States v. Columbia Ship Management
    2:13-cr-00205

Defendants pled guilty to knowing failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book, obstruction of an agency proceeding, obstruction of justice, and knowingly and willfully making and causing the making of materially false writings. The Defendants operate several vessels including the M/T King Emerald (a 27,507 gross ton crude oil/product tanker), the M/V Cape (a 35,708 gross ton container ship), and the M/T Cape Taft (a 42,000 gross ton crude oil/product tanker). Defendants were sentenced to pay a total monetary penalty of $10.4 million, of which $7,800,000 was designated as a criminal fine and $2,600 paid as community service.

Twelve Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $1,000,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations, false oil record book, defective waste oil incinerator, and unauthorized discharges of the bilge holding tank.

  • United States v. Consultores de Navegacion et al.
    1:08-CR-10274

A whistleblower onboard the M/T Nautilus reported violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships to the Coast Guard during an inspection. The whistleblower provided photographs of a “magic” bypass pipe hidden beneath the engine room deck plates. During the whistleblowers first attempt to disclose the information when the Coast Guard boarded the ship in St. Croix, the photographs were deleted from his phone. Once in Boston, the whistleblower again provided the camera to the Government and they were able to recovery the deleted photos from the camera’s memory. The vessel was boarded several times over five days and various records, including the Oil Record Book, and the bypass pipe were further examined. This whistleblower was one of two who reported such violations on the M/T Nautilus. In 2009, the court entered judgment against Consultores on four counts and was ordered to pay a criminal fine of $2,083,333.

A $400,000 reward was paid to two Filipino whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record books.

  • United States v. Cooperative Success Maritime S.A.
    4:10-cr-00035

The whistleblower was employed as an engineer a board the M/T Chem Faros. The whistleblower was one of several men who reported violations to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The whistleblower reported bypassing the Oil Water Separator and discharging oil-contaminated waste directly into the ocean and keeping a false Oil Record Book. Cooperative Success Maritime pled guilty to violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and making a false statement. The total fine was $850,000 of which $150,000 is a community service payment. A $50,000 reward was given to the whistleblower.

  • United States v. Crescent Ship Servs., Inc.
    2:94-cr-00383

The President of Crescent Ship Services Inc., and the company’s port captain, pleaded guilty to conspiring to violate the Pollution Act of 1990 and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The company manager also pleaded guilty to violating the Act to Prevent Pollution From Ships. Between 1991 and 1993, the crew regularly dumped engine parts, wooden pallets, chemical cleanser and plastic shrink wrap into the Mississippi river. They also dumped waste oil that accumulated in the bilges of the company’s boats. Further, on at least one occasion the company’s port captain personally dumped wooden pallets into the water. All of the dumping was conducted at night. The company agreed to pay a $250,000 fine and to establish an environmental compliance program. A $128,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower.

  • United States v. Diamlemos Shipping Corp
    2:08-cr-00265

Defendants pleaded guilty to two counts of failing to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book (“ORB”) in violation of APPS. Defendants knowingly failed to maintain the ORB for the M/T Georgis Nikolos between January 18, 2006 and March 18, 2006. The ORB contained entries that falsely stated oily bilge water was properly processed and disposed of through the Oil Water Separator (“OWS”), and omitted entries related to the overboard discharges of such water through a bypass hose. A $187,000 reward was given to three whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported using a hose to bypass the Oil Water Separator in order to discharge oil sludge and bilge water directly into the ocean and falsifying Oil Record Book entries.

  • United States v. Diana Shipping Services S.A.
    2:13-cr-00040

Defendants pleaded guilty to violations of APPS, specifically knowingly failed to maintain an Oil Record Book (“ORB”) for the M/V Thetis. Defendants were sentenced to pay a criminal fine of $300,000. Two whistleblowers, a Wiper and an Oiler on the vessel, documented two illegal bypass valves that dumped oily bilge water directly into the ocean. A $150,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the APPS.

  • United States v. Dianik Bross Shipping Corp.
    3:11-cr-00828

Defendants operated the M/V Kostas N, a bulk carrier vessel, that was involved in the improper use of the Oily Water Separator. The whistleblower worked as a crew member on the vessel twice in 2011. The whistleblower documented the illegal activity during his second trip, including videoing the Oily Water Separator in a tricked position; the meter did not read the actual effluent going overboard and actual read a sample from a fresh water line. Defendants were sentenced to two years probation and fined $500,000 for failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book. They also had to pay an additional $150,000 to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. A $250,000 reward was given to a whistleblower that provided law enforcement videotaped evidence of improper use of the the Oily Water Separator.

  • United States v. D/S Progress (Maric et al).
    1:00-cr-00318

D/S Progress, a Danish shipping company, was sentenced to pay a $250,000 criminal fine for conspiring to conceal a hazardous leak in the hull of the Freja Jutlandic, an oil tanker which first arrived in Baltimore on March 22, 2000. D/S failed to report emergency discharges to save the ship and presented false Oil Record Book books to the U.S. Coast Guard. Two whistleblowers who secretly wrote the Coast Guard a note detailing the illegal activity were awarded $125,000 (See image from the U.S. Department of Justice).

  • United States v. DSD Shipping A/S
    1:15-cr-00102 (2015)

Two whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $750,000.

  • United States v. DST Shipping, Inc.
    04-CR-01728

The M/V Katerina, a Maltese-flagged bulk cargo ship, was operated by DST Shipping, a Greek company. In September 2004, the vessel arrived in California and three whistleblowers wrote letters to the U.S. Coast Guard describing the illegal bypass system used to dump oily water into the ocean. They also drew a diagram about how the bypass system operated. Another whistleblower, the cook on the vessel, also wrote a letter at the request of the other whistleblowers describing the illegal activities. Defendants pleaded guilty and were sentenced to pay $1 million. A total of $250,000 was paid to the four Filipino whistleblowers.

  • United States v. Efploia Shipping Co.
    1:11-cr-00652

A $87,500 award was given to a whistleblower that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The Whistleblower reported disposing of oil-contaminated waste in the ocean with the use of a “magic pipe” and falsifying entries in the Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. Fairdeal Group Management SA.
    1:05-cr-00750

The Defendant, a Greek company, operated the M/T Fair Voyager, a 50,600 gross-ton Liberian oil tanker. The Chief Engineer and members of the crew regularly engaged in dumping oily bilge water directly overboard without first processing it through the Oily Water Separator. The Chief Engineer also routinely made false entries into the Oil Record Book to cover up the illegal activity. When the ship docked in New York, the U.S. Coast Guard boarded and conducted a routine investigation which resulted in the discovery of a “magic pipe” or bypass hose. An $87,500 reward was given to a whistleblower that reported the violations.

  • United States v. Fairmont Shipping (Canada) Ltd. et al.
    3:03-cr-00506

Defendants pled guilty to a violation of oil pollution prevention regulations and sentenced to four years probation and a fine of $450,000. An $225,000 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Fleet Management Limited
    6:10-cr-00051

The Defendant, a Hong Kong company, operated the M/V Lowlands Sumida, a Panamanian flagged ship. The Defendant failed to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book and record that the Oily Water Separator had been bypassed to directly dump oily water into the ocean. They were sentenced to pay a fine of $3 million. A $200,000 award was given to whistleblowers that reported the violations.

  • United States v. Fujitrans Corporation
    3:04-cr-00531 (2005)

Defendant is a transportation facilitation company headquartered in Japan. On one of the vessels owned and managed by the Defendant, M/V Cygnus, a Panamanian flagged ship weighing 44,356 gross tons, a crew member reported to U.S. authorities that oily wastes were illegally discharged overboard through a bypass hose. The whistleblower said proof existed by looking in the Manned Zero Checklist. Defendants pled guilty to failing to maintain an Oil Record Book. Defendants were fined $335,000 and award a whistleblower $90,000.

  • United States v. General Maritime Management (Portugal) L.D.A. et al
    2:08-cr-00393

The Defendants, a Portuguese company, owned the M/T Genmar Defiance, a Liberian registered ship. The Defendants failed to keep an accurate Oil Record Book and illegally bypassed the Oily Water Separator to dumpy oily water directly into the ocean. Defendants were sentenced to pay a $1 million fine. A $250,000 reward was paid to five whistleblowers that reported the violations.

  • United States v. Giusseppe Bottiglieri Shipping Company S.P.A
    1:12-CR-00057

Defendants operated the M/V Bottiglieri Challenger who illegally discharged oily waster directly into the sea without first using the Oily Water Separator. The Court imposed a total monetary penalty of $1.3 million ($1 million criminal fine and $300,000 as a community service payment). A $500,000 reward was paid to five whistleblowers who reported the violations. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record book.

  • United States v. Gulf Stolt Ship Management 
    2:13-CR-00149 (2013)

Defendants pled guilty to falsification of an Oil Record Book and violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and were fined $750,000 and $100,000 to be paid to the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. A reward of $187,500 was paid to a whistleblower. The whistleblower reported illegal activity to the Coast Guard when they boarded the ship. The whistleblower described for the Coast Guard how the overboard discharge of untreated oily waste occurred, the falsification of the Oily Record Book, and photographs of the flexible hoses.

  • United States v. Hachiuma Steamship Co Ltd. & Ireneo Tuale & Noly Torato Vidad
    1:14-CR-00505, 00513, 1:15-CR-00005

$250,000 Reward paid to one crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: Sent a webmail to U.S. Coast Guard

  • United States v. Herm. Dauelsberg GMBH & CO. KG,
    3:15-cr-00042

A $500,000 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported failing to record the discharging of bunker fuel overboard in the Oil Record Book as well as not reporting a hull fracture on the side shell of the Number 4 Starboard Fuel Oil Tank to the United States Coast Guard.

  • United States v. Hiong Guan Navegacion Japan Co
    8:08-CR-00494

$337,500 Reward paid to two Filipino whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe).

  • United States v. Hoegh Fleet Services
    CR03-5596RBL

A $300,000 reward was paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The whistleblower reported to the Coast Guard a note and a diagram detailing the use of an oil bypass system. (See diagram drawn by the whistleblower, U.S. Department of Justice).

  • United States v. Holland America
    98-cr-0108

Defendants were a U.S. operator of the cruise ship M/V Rotterdam and made cruises in Alaskan and Canadian waters. They illegally discharged bilge water without use of the Oil Water Separator. An engineer on board the ship refused a order to directly discharge overboard and reported to U.S. Coast Guard that the Oily Water Separator on the ship was often not operational and, despite crew being aware of this, no repairs were ordered. Defendants violated two counts of failing to keep an accurate Oil Record Book and illegally bypassing the Oily Water Separator. They were fined $2,000,000, of which $1,000,000 was to be paid to the National Park Foundation. A $500,000 reward paid to a whistleblower.

  • United States v. Holy House Shipping AB
    1:08-CR-00782

$375,000 Reward paid to two whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Ilios Shipping Company S.A.
    2:11-CR-00286, 00262, 00263

$350,000 Reward paid to one whistleblower who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record books.

  • United States v. Ionia Management
    3:07-cr-00134

Seven whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $1,400,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe), and a false oil record book.

  • United States v. Irika Maritime S.A.
    3:06-CR-05661

Irika Shipping is a Panamanian registered corporation with headquarters in Greece who owned M/V Irika, 30,046 ton ocean bulk carrier. During an inspection by the U.S. Coast Guard, a flexible hose was discovered being a sewage tank and determined it was used to bypass the Oily Water Separator. Defendants pled guilty to failing to keep an accurate Oil Record Book. Several members of the crew provided information to the Coast Guard confirming it was used to discharge oily sludge overboard. Defendants were sentenced to four years probation and fined $500,000 and $250,000 for community service. A reward of $250,000 was paid to one Australian engineer.

  • United States v. Irika Shipping S.A.
    1:10-CR-00372

Irika Shipping is a Panamanian registered corporation with headquarters in Greece. Defendants were operator and technical manager of the M/V Iorana, a 40,170 gross ton cargo ship. The Chief Engineer from June to December 2009 was convicted in 2007 involving Irika Shipping. The Chief Engineer continued to be employed by Irika Shipping, but no training or oversight was provided. Instead, the Chief Engineer ordered that the oily discharge be dumped directly overboard as frequent alarms keeps going off on the Oily Water Separator. The successor Chief Engineer ordered a bypass pipe be installed to dump oily bilge water directly into the sea. Defendants pled guilty to obstructing agency proceedings, falsification of records, and violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The defendants were fined $2,500,000, of which $500,000 was awarded to four whistleblowers. Workers reported that the Chief Engineer directing him to discharge oily sludge directly overboard in violation of international laws prohibiting those practices and photographed them.

  • United States v. Kassian Maritime Navigation Agency
    1:12-CR-00057

Four whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $500,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and discharge of oil overboard using buckets.

  • United States v. Keoje Marine Co.
    1:11-cr-01258

A $150,000 reward was given to a whistleblower that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The whistleblower reported that the vessel had been discharging bilge waste without the use of an Oil Water Separator and making false entries in the Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. Marine Managers
    2:14-cr-00118

A $200,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported discharging oil-contaminated bilge water without the use of a properly functioning Oily Water Separator and created false records in the Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. MK Ship management
    2:06-cr-00307

A $100,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported not properly using the Oily-Water separator, discharging oil sludge and oil-contaminated bilge waste directly overboard with the use of a “magic pipe” and falsifying Oil Record Book entries.

  • United States v. Nimmrich und Prahm Bereederung GmbH & CO.KG et al
    4:12-cr- 00594

$133,334 reward for two whistleblowers that reported violations of MARPOL.

  • United States v. Noble Drilling (U.S.) LLC
    3:14-cr-00114

A whistleblower who reported violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution From Ships, the Non-indigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention And Control Act, and the Ports And Waterways Safety Act on a Noble Drilling vessel was rewarded $512,000. The crewman reported a false oil record book, a falsely reported operational oil water separator, and the illegal overboard discharge of machinery space bilge water.

  • United States v. Noka Shipping Company Ltd.
    2:11-CR-00534 / C-11-534

$250,000 Reward paid to one clerk who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in discharging oily wastes directly into the sea without first being processed through mandatory pollution prevention equipment as well as saying that at night crew members dumped liquids over board.

  • United States v. Norbulk Shipping UK Ltd. & Valerii Georgiev
    15-CR-00116, 00294

$250,000 Reward paid to three Filipino crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.
Workers reported: Information about the dumping activities that occurred. Videotaped the illegal activities and provided the coast guard with vital information and testimony.

  • United States v. Norwegian Cruise Line Limited
    1:02-cr- 20631

$250,000 paid to a crew member who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships Worker reported: Unauthorized discharge of oil contaminated bilge waste, an inadequate OWS system and a false Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. Odfjell Asia II Pte Ltd. and Leuterio
    3:14-CR-00038, 00039

 $450,000 Reward paid to two Filipino whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported unauthorized discharges of the bilge holding tank.

  • United States v. Odysea Carriers, S.A.
    2:12-cr-00105 (2012)

Defendants pled guilty to violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, obstruction of justice, and violation of ports and waterways safety program act. They were fined $1,200,000 of which $100,000 is to be paid to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. A $183,000 award was paid to a whistleblower for reporting where the “magic hose” was and how it was connected from the sludge pump and then to an overboard discharge valve. The whistleblower also kept the sounding log of the oil and sludge tanks from being destroyed at the direction of the Chief Engineer and produced them to the Coast Guard to further show the falsity of the Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. Ofer (Ship Holding) Ltd.
    4:08-cr-00103 (2008)

Defendants pled guilt to false statements and failure to maintain an Oil Record Book. They were sentenced or 3 years probation and a $780,000 fine. A $140,000 award was paid to three whistleblowers.

  • United States v. OMI Corporation
    2:04-cr-00060

A $2,100,000.00 reward was given to a whistleblower that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Oceanic Illsabe Ltd.
    7:15-cr-00108 (2015)

Six whistleblowers were rewarded a total of $150,000 for reporting violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Overseas Shipping
    1:06−cr−10408

Oversees Shipping Group, Inc., who operates one of the largest oil tanker fleets in the world, were successfully prosecuted for illegally discharging sludge and oily waste and concealing the pollution through falsifying their Oil Record Book. The prosecution resulted in 33 felony convictions and a $37 million penalty in 6 different jurisdictions, of which $27.8 million was a criminal fine (of which $800,000 was dedicated by statute to the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund), $9.2 million was apportioned for organizational community service payments for marine environmental projects.

Award: Twelve Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, including oil water separator violations, false oil record book, defective waste oil incinerator, and unauthorized discharges of the bilge holding tank were rewarded $5,250,000.

  • United States v. Polar Tankers
    3:07-CR-00124

$250,000 Reward paid to one crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: An oil spill occurred while the ship was transferring oily bilge water from the bilges to a holding tank and a drain line was left open. The oil spilled onto the deck of the ship and ran out the scuppers. Took a video as well.

  • United States v. Polembros Shipping
    2:09-cr-00252

Nine Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $540,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations and false oil record book.

  • United States v. Princess Cruises 0:93-cr-06058 (1993)

Defendants pled guilty to Count 1 of knowingly discharged plastic bags filled with garbage into the sea and had to pay a fine of $500,000. A reward of $250,000 was paid to a whistleblower.

  • United States v. Princess Cruises
    1:16-cr-20897 (2016)

Princess Cruise Lines’ Caribbean Princess was approximately 23 nautical miles from the shore and within the Exclusive Economic Zone of the United Kingdom when it dumped approximately 4,227 gallons of illegally discharged oily bilge water on August 26, 2013.The whistleblower, a newly hired engineer who was on his second three-month contract with Princess, witnessed a bypass pipe (also known in the maritime industry as the “magic pipe”) being used to bypass the oil water separator and dump directly into the ocean. The whistleblower notified United Kingdom’s Maritime and Coastguard Agency (“MCA”) and provided them with video and photographic evidence depicting the magic pipe and how the rate of discharge from an oily bilge water store tank was operating faster than it could be processed in the ship’s oily water separator. Defendants pled guilty to one count of conspiracy, three counts of failure to maintain and accurate Oil Record Book, and two counts of obstruction of agency proceedings.

Princess Cruise Lines was sentenced to pay $30 million in criminal fines and be apportioned as follows: $27 million for knowingly and willfully entering into a conspiracy, $2 million for violating the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships ($1 million of which will be paid to the whistleblower), $1 million for obstructing agency proceedings, and $10 million to community service projects to benefit the maritime environment. Of the $10 million, $3 million of the community service payments will be distributed to environmental projects in South Florida and $1 million will be allocated for projects to benefit the marine environment in United Kingdom waters.

  • United States v. Reederei Karl Schlueter
    2:08-cr-00341

A $251,000 reward was given to four whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported a falsified Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. Regency Cruises, Inc.
    8:94-cr-00245

A $75,000 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. Sabine Transportation Co. (Stickle)
    04-20072-cr-gold

Sabine Transportation pled guilty to eight counts of illegally dumping waste materials, including oily water, contaminated grain, and plastics; and for failing to maintain the Oil Record Book. The company had to pay a $2 million penalty. In September 2004, the chief officer pled guilty to conspiracy and violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships.

The whistleblowers were two crew members aboard the S.S. Trinity who informed the U.S. Coast Guard that thousands of gallons of contaminated diesel fuel had been illegally discharged from that vessel. Similarly, another whistleblower was a crew member aboard the S.S. Juneau who informed the U.S. Coast Guard that hundreds of tons of diesel contaminated wheat had been illegally discharged overboard. These whistleblowers were awarded a total of $1 million for reporting MARPOL and Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships violations.
  • United States v. Sanford Ltd. et al 
    1:11-cr-00352

A $79,167 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported an inaccurate Oil Record Book and discharging oil-contaminated waste without properly using an Oily Water Separator.

  • United States v. Stanships, Inc. (Marshall Islands)
    2:11-cr-00057

A $137,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported inaccurate entries in the Oil Record Book and unauthorized dumping of waste oil sludge and oil-contDockeInformation

  • United States v. Sun Ace Shipping Company
    2:06-cr- 00705

A $133,332 reward was given to three whistleblowers that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Workers reported Oily Water Separator violations due to the use of a “magic pipe” and a false Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. STX et al
    8:09-CR-00163 (2009)

$500,000 Reward paid to a whistleblower who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

  • United States v. STX Pan Ocean Co. Ltd.
    3:08-CR-05653, 5686 (2008)

$250,000 Reward paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea overnight using plastic bags and barrels.

  • United States v. Styga Compania Naviera S.A.
    4:09-CR-00572 (2009)

$312,500 Reward paid to five crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: A magic pipe that some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea without passing the waste through mandatory pollution reduction and prevention equipment.

  • United States v. Target Ship Management Pte. Ltd.et al.
    1:11-CR-00368 (2011)

$250,000 Reward paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea without passing the waste through mandatory pollution reduction and prevention equipment using a magic pipe.

  • United States v. Thome Ship Mgmt. PTE, Ltd. & Egyptian Tanker Co.
    1:17-cr-00075 (2017)

A $250,000 reward was paid to one individual who notified the Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit that the M/T ETC Mena was illegally dumping oily wastes overboard into the ocean. The notification included a written statement, photographs, and video showing the bypass system in operation on board the vessel transferring unfiltered bilge waste from the primary bilge tank to the clean drain tank using a pneumatic pump and then overboard using the general service fire pump. The information allowed the Coast Guard to inspect the vessel, discovering violations of the APPS that led to successful convictions.

  • United States v. Transmar Shipping (Dimitrakis)
    4:10-cr-00552 (2010)

In 2010, multiple crew members informed the Coast Guard they were instructed to illegal dump oily sludge into the sea by way of a bypass value. Dimitrios Dimitrakis was a chief engineer for the M/V New Fortune, operated by Transmar Shipping, and was sentenced to pay a $5,000 fine and three-year term of probation for directing crew members to use a bypass hose to illegal dump oil into the sea. Transmar Shipping was sentenced to pay a $750,000 fine and make a $100,000 community service payment.

They also had to complete a three-year term of probation and implement an environmental compliance plan. A $200,000 reward was given to three whistleblowers that reported and provided photographic evidence of the violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported discharging oil waste directly overboard through a bypass hose that circumvented the Oil Water Separator and Oil Content Meter as well as a false Oil Record Book.

  • United States v. Ulysses Cruises, Inc. et. al
    97-CR-00694 (1997)

Defendants operated the cruise ship, Dolphin Cruise Lines, Inc., who illegally dumped garbage bags into the sea near the Florida Keys. Defendants pled guilty to two counts of knowingly discharging plastic bags filled with garbage into the sea and one count of negligently discharging harmful quantities of oil into the water of the contiguous zone. Defendants were sentenced to five years probation and a fine of $275,000. A $25,000 reward was paid to two whistleblowers.

  • United States v. Wallenius Ship Management
    2:06-cr-00213 (2006)

Four whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $625,000. Crewmen reported failure to maintain an accurate oil record book, unauthorized discharge of the bilge holding tank, and oily water separator violations.

  • Click here for table of Whistleblower Awards rewarded in each case.