HomeLaw’s Statutes and RegulationsCases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Introduction to APPS/MARPOL

MARPOL was developed through a United Nations agency known as the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The IMO deals with maritime safety and security, as well as the prevention of marine pollution at sea. Under MARPOL, ships must conform to specific standards regarding the stowing, handling, shipping, and transferring of pollutant cargoes, as well as standards for the discharge of ship-generated operational wastes. MARPOL consists of six separate Annexes which set out regulations covering the various sources of ship-generated pollution. Annex I and II are mandatory for all signatory nations to MARPOL; Annexes III – VI are optional.

In order to implement the provisions of MARPOL, the U.S. passed the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS) in 1980. APPS applies to U.S. commercial vessels, as well as non-U.S. commercial vessels operating in U.S. waters or ports of U.S. jurisdiction. APPS makes it a crime to knowingly violate certain provisions of MARPOL and other oil pollution laws. The United States Coast Guard and the U.S Environmental Protection Agency are the main enforcers of MARPOL and APPS within the U.S. Additionally, APPS includes whistleblower provisions to help combat illegal pollution and empower and incentivize workers to expose any known information about pollution from ships.



Click here for table of Whistleblower Awards rewarded in each case.

2021

2:21-CR-00020

In 2021, Diana Wilhelmsen Management Limited (“DWM”) pleaded guilty to two felony violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS). These occurred on the Cyprus-based company’s commercial vessel M/V Protefs. Crew members aboard the 738-foot bulk carrier were aware of oily bilge water that had been disposed of overboard yet failed to report the dumpings in the Oil Record Book: a violation of APPS. These illegal discharges took place between April and June of 2020. An emergency dewatering system was used to dump fluid from the bilge’s holding tank, duct keel, and bilge wells overboard.

DWM was handed a $2 million fine, placed on a four-year probation, and instructed to implement a comprehensive Environmental Compliance Plan. The ship’s Chief Engineer Vener Dailisan admitted to having made false statements to the Coast Guard inspector about the accuracy of these logs and was sentenced to a $3,000 fine and two years of probation himself.

Three crew members turned whistleblowers, Benigno Ignacio Jr., Ronald C. Garma, and Martin Diuco received equal cuts of the $450,000 APPS award for their aid in the investigation.

2020

1:20-CR-00004

Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement of Singapore was charged with a felony violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS) after failing to maintain complete and accurate records of bilge waste discharge. Pollution prevention equipment aboard the ship was bypassed, allowing for oily waste to be dumped directly into the ocean from the Topaz Express. Incinerator debris was ordered to be illegally disposed of overboard while the ship ran overnight. Skenda Reddy, Chief Engineer of the ship, also destroyed paper sounding sheets and altered a copy of the vessel’s electronic sounding log to avoid detection. During a Coast Guard inspection, a crewmember handed over an electronic storage device containing picture and video evidence of pumps and hoses used to transfer bilge waste overboard.

Bernhard was ordered to pay a $1.75 million fine, the largest for this type of offense ever ordered in the District of Hawaii. The company was also served a four-year probation and had to implement an Environmental Compliance Plan. The whistleblower who first reported the illegal waste transfer was awarded $300,000.

6:20-CR-00103

Misuga Kaiun Co. LTD (“Misuga”), an international shipping company based in Japan, pleaded guilty to violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS) after failing to maintain their oil record book, covering up illegal disposals of oily bilge waste. The Chief Engineer of the M/V Diamond Queen, Cloyd Dimapilis, pleaded guilty to falsifying the oil record book after knowing that the tainted waste was dumped without going through pollution-prevention equipment on multiple occasions. During a Coast Guard inspection, crewmember Emmanuel A. Nestal gave intel into the discharges, including photo and video evidence of the altered engine room systems allowing for the infrastructure to be bypassed. Other crew members corroborated this whistleblower’s story.

Misuga was sentenced to a fine of $1.5 million and placed on a four-year probation. As a special condition of probation, Misuga was instructed to implement a comprehensive Environmental Compliance Plan. Whistleblower Emmanuel Nestal was awarded $375,00 for his aid in the investigation.

4:20-CR-00090

The Singapore-based company Pacific Carriers Limited (PCL) pled guilty to violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS), obstruction of justice, and for a failure to notify the U.S. Coast Guard of a hazardous condition on the Motor Vessel (M/V) Pac Antares. PCL admitted that crew members failed to record the discharge of oily waste and bilge water in the Oil Record Book, a breach of APPS. The 586-foot commercial bulk carrier was equipped with pollution-prevention infrastructure, yet it was bypassed for approximately 5 months while the ship traveled to North Carolina.

When the ship arrived at port, a crewmember alerted a Customs officer that he had information about the illegal activity. This led to a Coast Guard investigation that uncovered the polluted discharges that had taken place. 60,000 gallons of oily water was discovered in the duct keel, leading PCL to the hazardous condition charge. The laundry sink was used to allow for oily waste to pass through and empty overboard. The crew had also been discharging oily garbage and plastic into the ocean and subsequently falsifying the garbage record book, along with throwing oily rags overboard.

PCL was handed a $12 million fine, placed on a four-year probation, and instructed to implement a comprehensive Environmental Compliance Plan as a result of their eight felony offenses across three judicial districts. In 2008, the same ship was involved in a case that led to a $2.1 million criminal penalty. The whistleblower received a net award of $700,000 after IRS withholdings of the other $300,000.

1:20-CR-00030

In October 2019, the Coast Guard received a report of oil discharge coming from the Pacific International Lines Limited-operated M/V Kota Harum in the Port of Guam. Inspectors did in fact find that oil was, knowingly, being discharged into the water and along shorelines. Valves had been opened in the engine room, triggering the ship’s emergency ballast pump and causing oily bilge water, oily residues, and oily mixtures to go overboard. The failure to report this in the Oil Record Book resulted in a violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS).

Pacific International Lines faced a penalty of $3 million. Of that, $2 million was designated by the courts to be community service payments to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Two $500,000 criminal fines went to the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund and the Crime Victims Fund.

2019

1:19-MJ-00069

In 2019, Chartworld Shipping Corporation, Nederland Shipping Corporation, and Chief Engineer Vasileios Mazarakis were found guilty under six separate charges. This included failure to keep accurate pollution control records, falsifying records, obstruction of justice, and witness tampering. A U.S. Coast Guard inspection revealed inaccurate logs in the Oil Record Book, which is a violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Lower-level crew members of the M/V Nederland Reefer were instructed to withhold evidence from the Coast Guard, as well as destroy evidence of the illegal discharges, leading to the various other charges. The hull of the ship was also damaged, allowing for seawater to enter tanks aboard the ship, leading to a charge of failure to report hazardous conditions.

Water samples running through the Oil Content Monitor were diluted so that no oil was detected, though that oil was present in what was discharged overboard. The ship’s Chief Engineer ordered crew members to reroute houses, subsequently mixing oil sludge and bilge systems, a MARPOL violation in itself. Crew members were ordered to cut up and paint pipes ahead of a Coast Guard inspection so that no wrongdoing could be detected.

Chartworld was placed on a four-year probation and ordered to pay a criminal fine of $900,000. The other defendant was ordered to pay $900,000, leaving the total fine at $1.8 million. An Environmental Compliance Plan was instructed to be funded and implemented by Chartworld. Though the whistleblower did not originally comply, they later came forward with information that aided in the charges brought forth. For that reason, the whistleblower was granted an award of $25,000.

2:19-CR-004340

Portline Bulk International S.A. (“Portline”), a Portuguese company, was charged with both a violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS) and obstruction of documents relating to the APPS charge. Crew members aboard the 28,718 gross ton bulk carrier M/V Achilleus observed the oil-tainted bilge and bilge tank, a result of runoff, spills, and leaks from other areas of the ship. Beginning in mid-2017, the Chief and Second Engineers of the ship ordered lower-level crew members to perform illegal bypasses of the Oil Water Separator, a piece of equipment installed in the ship to ensure uncontaminated dumps. They also consented to these illegal actions and used a “magic pipe” to reroute the oily substances off the ship.

These infringements happened over the terms of three separate Chief Engineers in a span of 16 months. There were at least 40 illegal bypass operations resulting in oil pollution. There were instances in which these discharges were happening as frequently as once a week. Once the ship would leave a port, a day or two later, the magic pipe was connected and left to funnel polluted substances off the ship while it traveled. The pipes were then dislodged and hidden as the ship approached the next port. Crew members went as far as to say that specialized equipment for filtering out pollution from the fluid was “for display only, just for show,” and instead had clean water run through it during recorded use. This led to the false record keeping of the Oil Record Book.

Portline was sentenced to pay a criminal fine of $1.5 million and placed on probation for four years. At their own expense, Portline was ordered to create and implement an Environmental Compliance Plan. Two whistleblowers received awards of $150,000, while the third received $200,000 for a total award amount of $500,000.

1:19-MJ-00110

Nikolaos Vastardis, the Chief Engineer for the Nigerian oil tanker M/T Evridiki, was charged alongside co-defendants Evridiki Navigation Inc. and Liquimar Tankers Management Services Inc. for failing to keep accurate pollution control records, falsifying records, and obstruction of justice. In March of 2019, Vastardis inaccurately maintained the Oil Record Book in violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. When the Coast Guard boarded the ship to inspect the pollution control equipment, Vastardis lied to officials about how the equipment was used.

Vastardis was placed on probation for three years and faced a $7,500 fine.

1:19-CR-00024

The Japanese company Fukuichi Gyogyo Kabushiki Kaisha (“Fukuichi”) was charged with violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS) while operating it’s 1,093 gross ton fishing vessel the F/V Fukuichi Maru No. 112. While in the District of Guam, this ship was found to have falsely maintained their Garbage Record Book, and not recorded their illegal dumping of fishing gear and plastics overboard. Similarly, the ship’s Oil Record Book had 26 erased entries and false information about their use of the pollution-preventing Oil Water Separator infrastructure on the ship.

Fukuichi was fined $1.5 million. The company was banned from entering the Exclusive Economic Zone, Territorial Sea, ports, or terminals belonging to the United States unless it implemented an approved Environmental Compliance Plan.

4:19-CR-00559

FGL Moon Marshall Limited (“FGL Moon”), Unix Line PTE, Ltd. (“Unix”), and Gilbert Fajardo Dela Cruz were co-defendants in the 2019 case involving the M/T Zao Galaxy, an oil tankship registered in the Marshall Islands. A routine inspection by the Coast Guard revealed, thanks to turned over video evidence, that there had been approximately four illegal disposals of oily waste from the ship’s engine room during voyage. One of the dumpings took place only 3 nautical miles from the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, CA.

Dela Cruz, as First Assistant Engineer, had ordered crew members to perform the discharges, and empty, clean, and repaint the bilge tank ahead of inspection. Dela Cruz also had a hose system used to bypass oily waste infrastructure. These were not reported in the Oil Record Book, a violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, and Dela Cruz had even instructed crew members to withhold information from the Coast Guard.

FGL Moon was fined $1.65 million for their actions. Two former crew members turned whistleblowers received $412,500 each for their aid in the investigation.

2018

4:19-CR-00559

FGL Moon Marshall Limited (“FGL Moon”), Unix Line PTE, Ltd. (“Unix”), and Gilbert Fajardo Dela Cruz were co-defendants in the 2019 case involving the M/T Zao Galaxy, an oil tankship registered in the Marshall Islands. A routine inspection by the Coast Guard revealed, thanks to turned over video evidence, that there had been approximately four illegal disposals of oily waste from the ship’s engine room during voyage. One of the dumpings took place only 3 nautical miles from the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, CA.

Dela Cruz, as First Assistant Engineer, had ordered crew members to perform the discharges, and empty, clean, and repaint the bilge tank ahead of inspection. Dela Cruz also had a hose system used to bypass oily waste infrastructure. These were not reported in the Oil Record Book, a violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, and Dela Cruz had even instructed crew members to withhold information from the Coast Guard.

FGL Moon was fined $1.65 million for their actions. Two former crew members turned whistleblowers received $412,500 each for their aid in the investigation.

2:18-CR-00099

Sea World Management & Trading, Inc. (“SWMT”), was operating the tank vessel Sea Faith to and from Corpus Christi, Texas when it violated the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS). The master of the 27,627 gross ton ship was responsible for the control of oily substances aboard, as well as the proper disposal of waste and garbage from the vessel. SWMT was charged with having knowingly failed to maintain their Oil Record Book and Garbage Record Book to reflect the dumping of oil, oil residue, oily rags, plastic, steel, and batteries overboard.

SWMT was ordered to comply with a comprehensive Environmental Compliance Plan, as well a pay a total criminal fine of $2,250,000. Of this amount, $750,000 was paid to the Abandoned Seafarers Foundation.

12 whistleblowers were awarded for their help in the investigation. The awards ranged from $30,000 to $380,000 each and totaled $1,000,000 before the retraction of attorney’s fees.

7:18-CR-00030

Japanese shipping company Nitta Kisen Kaisha Ltd. (“Nitta”) was charged in 2018 with obstruction of justice and falsification of an Oil Record Book under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships to cover-up intentional oil pollution aboard their ship the M/V Atlantic Oasis. The company admitted to failing to record oily waste dumps from their ships bilge and holding tank. In a 2017 Coast Guard inspection, a low-ranking crewmember aided inspectors, pointed out where hoses were hidden, and told them how the ship’s Chief Engineer, Jihnyun Youn, had ordered these illegal dumps. Youn then lied to inspectors while they were aboard, but eventually admitted to his role in the unlawful actions.

Nitta was ordered to pay a $1 million fine, as well as go on a three-year probation while following a court-approved Environmental Compliance Plan. Chief Engineer Jihnyun Youn was placed on probation for one year and ordered a $5,500 fine. Two whistleblowers, Felix Talitod Efondo and Jeffrey Ducay Dela Pena, were each granted $125,000 for aiding in the investigation.

1:18-CR-00086

Navimax Corporation (“Navimax”) of Marshall Islands was charged with both a violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS) and obstruction of a Coast Guard investigation. During a 2017 boarding of Navimax’s 750-foot-long oil tanker Nave Cielo, a crewmember handed Coast Guard inspectors a thumb drive that contained video footage inconsistent with the Oil Record Book handed over during the inspection. Specifically, two videos showed dark oil waste pumped off the side of the ship into international waters while the ship was traveling from New Orleans, Louisiana to Belgium. Crew members had been instructed to scrub the deck and hull of the ship to rid them of the excess oil.

Navimax was ordered to pay an immediate $2 million fine and placed on a four-year probation. The company was ordered to submit an Environmental Management Augmentation Plan to the court within 45 days of their sentencing. The ship’s former Chief Officer, Roman Maksymov, was also charged under APPS, as he oversaw the record book and had bypassed the proper dumping procedures himself.

1:18-CR-00118

Both Avin International LTD and Nicos I.V. Special Maritime Enterprises, two Greek shipping companies, were charged under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships after oil was discharged from the ballast system of their M/T Nicos I.V.  into the surrounding water. The ballast system is meant to hold water and provide stability for the ship. Instead, the dumped ballast water contained large traces of oil. The ship Master was aware, due to a visible sheen in the substance, that oil was being discharged from the ballast system, yet no corrective action was taken. Even after crew members were aware of the pollution, no reports were made of the oil having been dumped. The Master and Chief Officer then attempted to remove the oil from the tanks but were unsuccessful. Upon arriving in Port Arthur, Texas, the Master reported the sheen to the National Response Center, which prompted a U.S. Coast Guard investigation.

During a Coast Guard interview, the Master lied to investigators and affirmed that the logs were accurate and that he was unaware of any polluting.

Avin International LTD and Nicos I.V. Special Maritime Enterprises were charged with a $4 million criminal fine. Of this fine, $3.2 million will serve as restitution payments to the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. The companies were ordered to fund and implement an Environmental Compliance Plan.

2:18-CR-00366

Interorient Marine Services Ltd., a vessel operating company, maintained false and incomplete oil records which failed to reflect the oily bilge water and cargo residue that was dumped by the ship into the ocean. The Ridgebury Alexandra Z, a 29,905 gross ton vessel, had pollution-prevention equipment onboard, yet bypassed it in the dumping of their waste. Instead, the machinery was flushed with fresh water so that a much purer substance was reported by the equipment’s sensors. These disposals were not recorded in the ship’s Oil Record Book, which violated the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

During a Coast Guard inspection, a crewmember handed over an electronic storage device containing picture and video evidence of this fabricated flushing. During a later interview, these whistleblowers told investigators about orders from the Chief Officer to conduct this illegal activity. The Chief Engineer lied to Coast Guard inspectors, and even instructed subordinate crew members to also lie to Coast Guard officials about the use of an incinerator, which was not logged in the Oil Record Book either.

Interorient was charged with a $2 million fine, put on a four-year probation, and ordered to implement an Environmental Compliance Plan. 8 whistleblowers were granted awards ranging from $75,000 to $225,00 each, which totaled $1 million.

2017

3:07-CR-00390, 00398

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Senior crew members ordered subordinate crew members on the Indian vessel M/V Sportsqueen (12,666 gross ton cargo vessel) to discharge oil-contaminated ballast water into the ocean by a number of methods, including the use of pies attached to deck vents of the ballast tank.

Crew members were also ordered to attach one end of a hose to the outlet of the bilge pump and the other end to the overboard valve of the Oil Water Separator (“OWS”) to discharge oily sludge directly into the ocean. Defendants also failed to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book and made several false entries regarding the the OWS and incinerator in order to conceal illegal discharges.

Award: Accord will pay a criminal fine of $1.75 million and serve a three year term of probation during which time all of the ships in its fleet will be banned from United States waters and ports. The judge ordered a $250,000 reward be paid to five whistleblowers who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

1:17-CR-00075

After the U.S. Coast Guard received tips from a crew member aboard the Liberian Thome Ship Management’s (“Thome”) M/T ETC MENA in 2016, an investigation was launched. The whistleblower claimed that the ship had illegally dumped bilge waste overboard, and a same-day investigation found that the ship did in fact contain a pump covered in oil, submerged in the primary bilge tank, similar to the one said to be used to pump this waste into the ocean. Pollution prevention equipment was on board but was illegally bypassed in the dumping of bilge water.

Further investigation found that crew members were instructed to throw plastic garbage bags filled with metal and incinerator ash into the water. These actions, along with the lack of accurate reporting in their Oil Record Book, led Thome to receive charges under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS).

Thome was ordered to pay a $1.5 million penalty, as well as participate in marine and coastal restoration efforts at three National Wildlife Refuges located on the Gulf of Mexico in East Texas. The company was put on a four-year probation and given a comprehensive Environmental Compliance Plan to abide by. A $400,000 community service payment was due immediately to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. $750,000 was granted to the Coast Guard’s Abandoned Seafarers Fund. The whistleblower, Amir Ahmed, received $250,000 for his aid in the investigation.

1:17-CR-00151

The Republic of Vanuatu-based Fishing Vessel Yuh Fa No. 201 was found to have maintained false and incomplete records about their methods for discharging oil and garbage from the ship. Owned by Yuh Fa Fishery Co. Ltd., the vessel operated in and around American Samoa. Engineers aboard the ship did not report that they had been illegally dumping oily bilge water into the South Pacific Ocean, bypassing the use of pollution prevention equipment thanks to reconstruction of the tubes by people aboard. These discharges were left out of the Oil Record Book.

Further, the company was charged with failing to keep records on the storing, sorting, and disposal of garbage. These pollutants were unaccounted for in the ship’s records. These actions led to two felony violations under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Yuh Fa Fishery was charged with a total fine of $2.5 million, $625,000 of which went to the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa as a community service payment. The company was ordered to serve a five-year probation.

2:17-CR-00117

MST Mineralien Schiffarht Spedition UND Transport GMBH (“MST”) was charged with both a violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships as well as obstruction of justice for attempting to hide deliberate pollution done aboard their 185-meter-long ship, the M/V Marguerita. MST failed to maintain their Oil Record Book and was also charged for aiding and abetting in their falsification of documents. The German company had been using a “magic pipe” to redirect bilge fluid overboard, instead of through pollution prevention equipment that was on the ship.

MST was ordered to pay a $3.2 million criminal fine and serve a four-year probation, which included the implementation of an environmental compliance plan and independent inspections of the ships. Three whistleblowers, who were crew members that aided in the investigation, were granted a total of $250,000. (Docket #192)

2016

2:16-CR-00551

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Three whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded a total of $500,000. Crewmen reported failure to maintain an accurate oil record book, unauthorized discharge of the bilge holding tank, and oily water separator violations.

1:16-CR-20897

Princess Cruise Lines’ Caribbean Princess was approximately 23 nautical miles from the shore and within the Exclusive Economic Zone of the United Kingdom when it dumped approximately 4,227 gallons of illegally discharged oily bilge water on August 26, 2013.The whistleblower, a newly hired engineer who was on his second three-month contract with Princess, witnessed a bypass pipe (also known in the maritime industry as the “magic pipe”) being used to bypass the oil water separator and dump directly into the ocean. The whistleblower notified United Kingdom’s Maritime and Coastguard Agency (“MCA”) and provided them with video and photographic evidence depicting the magic pipe and how the rate of discharge from an oily bilge water store tank was operating faster than it could be processed in the ship’s oily water separator. Defendants pled guilty to one count of conspiracy, three counts of failure to maintain and accurate Oil Record Book, and two counts of obstruction of agency proceedings.APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Princess Cruise Lines was sentenced to pay $30 million in criminal fines and be apportioned as follows: $27 million for knowingly and willfully entering into a conspiracy, $2 million for violating the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships ($1 million of which will be paid to the whistleblower), $1 million for obstructing agency proceedings, and $10 million to community service projects to benefit the maritime environment. Of the $10 million, $3 million of the community service payments will be distributed to environmental projects in South Florida and $1 million will be allocated for projects to benefit the marine environment in United Kingdom waters.

2015

3:15-CR-00007

Defendant is the operator of the M/V City of Tokyo, a 42.047 gross tons vehicle carrier. Defendants pled guilty to violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and the Clean Water Act, <span”>33 U.S.C. § l3l9(c)(2)(A) and 33 U.S.C. § l32l(bX3). Defendants were sentenced to 3 years probation, a fine of $375,000, and a community service payment of $125,000. A $150,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower that reported the illegal dumping of oily bilge water into the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone off the coast of Alaska and Oregon.

1:15-CR-00610, 00616-00617

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Defendant Ciner Gemi Acente Isletni Sanayi Ve Ticaret S.A. is a Turkish company and owner and operator of the M/V Artvin, a 44,635 gross ton cargo vessel, pled guilty to two counts of knowingly failed to maintain an accurate in the District of Maryland and Virginia. Defendant had to pay a $900,800 penalty and $150,000 community service penalty. Crew members were directed to drain oily water from the Waste Oil Tank to buckets and/or absorb the oil from the contents of the buckets using a scoop and rags, and then discharge the remaining contents overboard. Other times crew members would connect a hose from a 55-gallon drum containing oily sludge and discharge the contents overboard. The dumping of oil overboard was not recorded in the Oil Record Book. A $250,000 reward was paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

1:15-cr-00102

Two whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $750,000.

3:15-cr-00042

A $500,000 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported failing to record the discharging of bunker fuel overboard in the Oil Record Book as well as not reporting a hull fracture on the side shell of the Number 4 Starboard Fuel Oil Tank to the United States Coast Guard.

1:15-CR-00294

$250,000 Reward paid to three Filipino crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.
Workers reported: Information about the dumping activities that occurred. Videotaped the illegal activities and provided the coast guard with vital information and testimony.

7:15-CR-00108

Six whistleblowers were rewarded a total of $150,000 for reporting violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

2014

8:14-CR-00500

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Carbofin is an Italian company who own and operate commercial liquefied petroleum gas vessels, including the M/T Marigola, a 12,500 gross ton ship. Crew members on the M/T Margola showed the U.S. Coast Guard during an inspection cell phone video of a bypass hose that appeared to contain a black oily substance. The Coast Guard determined that the hose was connected to the bilge tank and boiler blow down overboard discharge valve (typically to discharge hot water, steam, and alkaline) to illegally dump oily sludge. Defendant Carbofin pled guilty for failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book. Defendant had to pay a $2,150,000 penalty and $600,000 to the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation for use in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Four Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $1,075,000. Various crewmen reported Oily Water Separator violations and false oil record book.

2:14-CR-00118

A $200,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported discharging oil-contaminated bilge water without the use of a properly functioning Oily Water Separator and created false records in the Oil Record Book.

3:14-CR-00114

A whistleblower who reported violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution From Ships, the Non-indigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention And Control Act, and the Ports And Waterways Safety Act on a Noble Drilling vessel was rewarded $512,000. The crewman reported a false oil record book, a falsely reported operational oil water separator, and the illegal overboard discharge of machinery space bilge water.

3:14-CR-00038, 00039

$450,000 Reward paid to two Filipino whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported unauthorized discharges of the bilge holding tank.

2013

2:13-CR-00205

Defendants pled guilty to knowing failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book, obstruction of an agency proceeding, obstruction of justice, and knowingly and willfully making and causing the making of materially false writings. The Defendants operate several vessels including the M/T King Emerald (a 27,507 gross ton crude oil/product tanker), the M/V Cape (a 35,708 gross ton container ship), and the M/T Cape Taft (a 42,000 gross ton crude oil/product tanker). Defendants were sentenced to pay a total monetary penalty of $10.4 million, and $1,600,000 was given to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation as a community service payment.

Twelve Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $1,000,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations, false oil record book, defective waste oil incinerator, and unauthorized discharges of the bilge holding tank.

2:13-CR-00040

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Defendants pleaded guilty to violations of APPS, specifically knowingly failed to maintain an Oil Record Book (“ORB”) for the M/V Thetis. Defendants were sentenced to pay a criminal fine of $300,000. Two whistleblowers, a Wiper and an Oiler on the vessel, documented two illegal bypass valves that dumped oily bilge water directly into the ocean. A $150,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the APPS.

2:13-CR-00149

Defendants pled guilty to falsification of an Oil Record Book and violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and were fined $750,000 and $100,000 to be paid to the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. A reward of $187,500 was paid to a whistleblower. The whistleblower reported illegal activity to the Coast Guard when they boarded the ship. The whistleblower described for the Coast Guard how the overboard discharge of untreated oily waste occurred, the falsification of the Oily Record Book, and photographs of the flexible hoses.

2012

3:12-CR-00102

Defendants own the M/V Stellar Wind, a Liberia registered bulk carrier weighing 22,000 gross tons. Defendants illegally discharged oily bilge water into the Mississippi River in Louisiana. Defendants pled guilty to failing to maintain an accurate record book and was sentenced to three years probation and a fine of $300,000. A $150,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower.

1:12-CR-00057

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Defendants operated the M/V Bottiglieri Challenger who illegally discharged oily waster directly into the sea without first using the Oily Water Separator. The Court imposed a total monetary penalty of $1.3 million ($1 million criminal fine and $300,000 as a community service payment). A $500,000 reward was paid to five whistleblowers who reported the violations. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record book.

1:12-CR-00057

Four whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $500,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and discharge of oil overboard using buckets.

2:12-CR-00105

Defendants pled guilty to violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, obstruction of justice, and violation of ports and waterways safety program act. They were fined $1,200,000 of which $100,000 is to be paid to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. A $183,000 award was paid to a whistleblower for reporting where the “magic hose” was and how it was connected from the sludge pump and then to an overboard discharge valve. The whistleblower also kept the sounding log of the oil and sludge tanks from being destroyed at the direction of the Chief Engineer and produced them to the Coast Guard to further show the falsity of the Oil Record Book.

2011

1:11-CR-00671

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

One whistleblower who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships was rewarded $462,500. The same whistleblower received a $87,500 reward in United States v. Efploia Shipping.

3:11-CR-00828

Defendants operated the M/V Kostas N, a bulk carrier vessel, that was involved in the improper use of the Oily Water Separator. The whistleblower worked as a crew member on the vessel twice in 2011. The whistleblower documented the illegal activity during his second trip, including videoing the Oily Water Separator in a tricked position; the meter did not read the actual effluent going overboard and actual read a sample from a fresh water line. Defendants were sentenced to two years probation and fined $500,000 for failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book. They also had to pay an additional $150,000 to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. A $250,000 reward was given to a whistleblower that provided law enforcement videotaped evidence of improper use of the the Oily Water Separator.

1:11-CR-00652

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

A $87,500 award was given to a whistleblower that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The Whistleblower reported disposing of oil-contaminated waste in the ocean with the use of a “magic pipe” and falsifying entries in the Oil Record Book.

2:11-CR-00286, 00262, 00263

$350,000 Reward paid to one whistleblower who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record books.

1:11-cr-01258

A $150,000 reward was given to a whistleblower that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The whistleblower reported that the vessel had been discharging bilge waste without the use of an Oil Water Separator and making false entries in the Oil Record Book.

2:11-CR-00534, C-11-534

$250,000 Reward paid to one clerk who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in discharging oily wastes directly into the sea without first being processed through mandatory pollution prevention equipment as well as saying that at night crew members dumped liquids over board.

1:11-CR-00352

A $79,167 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported an inaccurate Oil Record Book and discharging oil-contaminated waste without properly using an Oily Water Separator.

2:11-CR-00057

A $137,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported inaccurate entries in the Oil Record Book and unauthorized dumping of waste oil sludge and oil.

1:11-CR-00368

$250,000 Reward paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea without passing the waste through mandatory pollution reduction and prevention equipment using a magic pipe.

2010

8:10-CR-00116

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Defendants, operators of the 9,544 gross ton M/T Kerim ship, pled guilty to the failure to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book and making a false statement. Crew members, acting on behalf of the Defendant, installed a bypass pipe to fit between the sludge discharge line and the blow down value and deliberately dumped oily sludge into the see without passing through the Oily Water Separator.

Defendant had to pay a $725,000 penalty of which a $250,000 reward was paid to two motormen whistleblowers who reported the violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

8:10-CR-00363

The M/V Avenue Star, a 10,965 ton ship, was owned by Defendants who operated it for commercial purposes.

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

In 2009, engineering officers and other crew members installed a bypass hose to bypass the Oil Water Separator to pump unfiltered pollution directly into the sea. These crew members also failed to keep an accurate Oil Record Book of the illegal dumping of oily water overboard. Defendants pled guilty to one count of failure to maintain an accurate record book and one count of making a false statement.

Defendants had to pay a $800,000 fine and $100,000 to community service restitution to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. A $250,000 reward was paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

4:10-CR-00035

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

The whistleblower was employed as an engineer a board the M/T Chem Faros. The whistleblower was one of several men who reported violations to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The whistleblower reported bypassing the Oil Water Separator and discharging oil-contaminated waste directly into the ocean and keeping a false Oil Record Book. Cooperative Success Maritime pled guilty to violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and making a false statement. The total fine was $850,000 of which $150,000 is a community service payment. A $50,000 reward was given to the whistleblower.

6:10-CR-00051

The Defendant, a Hong Kong company, operated the M/V Lowlands Sumida, a Panamanian flagged ship. The Defendant failed to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book and record that the Oily Water Separator had been bypassed to directly dump oily water into the ocean. They were sentenced to pay a fine of $3 million. A $200,000 award was given to whistleblowers that reported the violations.

1:10-CR-00372

Irika Shipping is a Panamanian registered corporation with headquarters in Greece. Defendants were operator and technical manager of the M/V Iorana, a 40,170 gross ton cargo ship. The Chief Engineer from June to December 2009 was convicted in 2007 involving Irika Shipping. The Chief Engineer continued to be employed by Irika Shipping, but no training or oversight was provided. Instead, the Chief Engineer ordered that the oily discharge be dumped directly overboard as frequent alarms keeps going off on the Oily Water Separator. The successor Chief Engineer ordered a bypass pipe be installed to dump oily bilge water directly into the sea. Defendants pled guilty to obstructing agency proceedings, falsification of records, and violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The defendants were fined $2,500,000, of which $500,000 was awarded to four whistleblowers. Workers reported that the Chief Engineer directing him to discharge oily sludge directly overboard in violation of international laws prohibiting those practices and photographed them.

4:10-CR-00552

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

In 2010, multiple crew members informed the Coast Guard they were instructed to illegal dump oily sludge into the sea by way of a bypass value. Dimitrios Dimitrakis was a chief engineer for the M/V New Fortune, operated by Transmar Shipping, and was sentenced to pay a $5,000 fine and three-year term of probation for directing crew members to use a bypass hose to illegal dump oil into the sea. Transmar Shipping was sentenced to pay a $750,000 fine and make a $100,000 community service payment.

They also had to complete a three-year term of probation and implement an environmental compliance plan. A $200,000 reward was given to three whistleblowers that reported and provided photographic evidence of the violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported discharging oil waste directly overboard through a bypass hose that circumvented the Oil Water Separator and Oil Content Meter as well as a false Oil Record Book.

2009

2:09-CR-00252

Nine Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $540,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations and false oil record book.

8:09-CR-00163

$500,000 Reward paid to a whistleblower who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

4:09-CR-00572

$312,500 Reward paid to five crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: A magic pipe that some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea without passing the waste through mandatory pollution reduction and prevention equipment.

2008

4:08-CR-00032, 00033

Defendant is an Italian company who operated the M/V Windsor Castle, a 30,000 gross ton ship, pled guilty to violating the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships and making a false statement.

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

The crew knowingly failed to maintain an accurate record book. Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea without passing the waste through the Oily Water Separator. A $300,000 reward was paid to six crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

4:08-CR-00448

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Defendants Casilda Shipping, Ltd., a Greek company that owns the Rio Gold, a 23,000 ton ocean-going cargo ship, pled guilty and sentenced to a three-year term of probation for ordering crew members to illegally bypass the Oil Water Separator to discharge oily waste overboard;

discharge two large plastic barrels, one filled with oil sludge and the other filled with hydrochloric acid. Defendants also falsified the Oil Record Book to conceal these activities.

Defendants must pay a $750,000 fine, $250,000 of which will be paid to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for use in projects to restore the Northern California coast. A $250,000 Reward paid to four crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

1:08-CR-10274

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

A whistleblower onboard the M/T Nautilus reported violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships to the Coast Guard during an inspection. The whistleblower provided photographs of a “magic” bypass pipe hidden beneath the engine room deck plates. During the whistleblowers first attempt to disclose the information when the Coast Guard boarded the ship in St. Croix, the photographs were deleted from his phone. Once in Boston, the whistleblower again provided the camera to the Government and they were able to recovery the deleted photos from the camera’s memory. The vessel was boarded several times over five days and various records, including the Oil Record Book, and the bypass pipe were further examined. This whistleblower was one of two who reported such violations on the M/T Nautilus. In 2009, the court entered judgment against Consultores on four counts and was ordered to pay a criminal fine of $2,083,333.

A $400,000 reward was paid to two Filipino whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record books.

2:08-CR-00265

Defendants pleaded guilty to two counts of failing to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book (“ORB”) in violation of APPS. Defendants knowingly failed to maintain the ORB for the M/T Georgis Nikolos between January 18, 2006 and March 18, 2006. The ORB contained entries that falsely stated oily bilge water was properly processed and disposed of through the Oil Water Separator (“OWS”), and omitted entries related to the overboard discharges of such water through a bypass hose. A $187,000 reward was given to three whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported using a hose to bypass the Oil Water Separator in order to discharge oil sludge and bilge water directly into the ocean and falsifying Oil Record Book entries.

2:08-CR-00393

The Defendants, a Portuguese company, owned the M/T Genmar Defiance, a Liberian registered ship. The Defendants failed to keep an accurate Oil Record Book and illegally bypassed the Oily Water Separator to dumpy oily water directly into the ocean. Defendants were sentenced to pay a $1 million fine. A $250,000 reward was paid to five whistleblowers that reported the violations.

8:08-CR-00494

$337,500 Reward paid to two Filipino whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe).

1:08-CR-00782

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

$375,000 Reward paid to two whistleblowers who reported violation of MARPOL convention acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

4:08-CR-00103

Defendants pled guilt to false statements and failure to maintain an Oil Record Book. They were sentenced or 3 years probation and a $780,000 fine. A $140,000 award was paid to three whistleblowers.

2:08-CR-00341

A $251,000 reward was given to four whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported a falsified Oil Record Book.

3:08-CR-05653, 5686

$250,000 Reward paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: Some members of the engineering crew were engaged in dumping oily waste directly into the sea overnight using plastic bags and barrels.

2007

3:07-CR-05412

Defendants owned and operated the M/V Tina M, a 35,063 gross ton ship, and failed to maintain an accurate Oil Record Book detailing the dumping of oily water overboard.

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Crew members attempted to conceal the area where a bypass pipe was installed to bypass the Oil Water Separator and dump illegally into the ocean. Defendants pled guilty to knowingly making a false statement and violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Defendants had to pay a $1,000,000 penalty. A $250,000 reward was paid to an engineer and a ship oiler who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Whistleblowers disclosure to authorities the ship board practice of bypassing required oil pollution prevention equipment and discharging oily waste directly into the ocean as well their use of a bypass pipe on numerous occasions over an extended period. In addition, independently verifying that the Chief Engineer directed the illegal discharge activity.

2:07-CR-00264

Defendant Clipper Marine Services pled guilty to conspiracy to defraud the United States, violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships, and false documents for violations of dumping oily waste overboard that occurred on the M/V Trojan in February 2006.

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Six Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $650,000.Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe) and false oil record book.

3:07-CR-00134

Seven whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $1,400,000. Various crewmen reported oily water separator violations (magic pipe), and a false oil record book.

3:07-CR-00124

$250,000 Reward paid to one crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Workers reported: An oil spill occurred while the ship was transferring oily bilge water from the bilges to a holding tank and a drain line was left open. The oil spilled onto the deck of the ship and ran out the scuppers. Took a video as well.

2006

3:06-CR-05661

Irika Shipping is a Panamanian registered corporation with headquarters in Greece who owned M/V Irika, 30,046 ton ocean bulk carrier. During an inspection by the U.S. Coast Guard, a flexible hose was discovered being a sewage tank and determined it was used to bypass the Oily Water Separator. Defendants pled guilty to failing to keep an accurate Oil Record Book. Several members of the crew provided information to the Coast Guard confirming it was used to discharge oily sludge overboard. Defendants were sentenced to four years probation and fined $500,000 and $250,000 for community service. A reward of $250,000 was paid to one Australian engineer.

2:06-CR-00307

A $100,000 reward was given to two whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. They reported not properly using the Oily-Water separator, discharging oil sludge and oil-contaminated bilge waste directly overboard with the use of a “magic pipe” and falsifying Oil Record Book entries.

1:06-CR-10408

Oversees Shipping Group, Inc., who operates one of the largest oil tanker fleets in the world, were successfully prosecuted for illegally discharging sludge and oily waste and concealing the pollution through falsifying their Oil Record Book. The prosecution resulted in 33 felony convictions and a $37 million penalty in 6 different jurisdictions, of which $27.8 million was a criminal fine (of which $800,000 was dedicated by statute to the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund), $9.2 million was apportioned for organizational community service payments for marine environmental projects.

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Award: Twelve Filipino whistleblowers who reported violations of MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, including oil water separator violations, false oil record book, defective waste oil incinerator, and unauthorized discharges of the bilge holding tank were rewarded $5,250,000.

2:06-CR-00705

A $133,332 reward was given to three whistleblowers that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. Workers reported Oily Water Separator violations due to the use of a “magic pipe” and a false Oil Record Book.

2:06-CR-00213

Four whistleblowers who reported violations of the MARPOL and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships were rewarded $625,000. Crewmen reported failure to maintain an accurate oil record book, unauthorized discharge of the bilge holding tank, and oily water separator violations.

2005

05-CR-00035

Defendants pled guilty to three counts of failure to maintain an accurate oil record book. Defendants were sentenced to a 5 year probation and fined $1,500,000 with additional terms for criminal monetary penalties. A $250,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

1:05-CR-00750

The Defendant, a Greek company, operated the M/T Fair Voyager, a 50,600 gross-ton Liberian oil tanker. The Chief Engineer and members of the crew regularly engaged in dumping oily bilge water directly overboard without first processing it through the Oily Water Separator. The Chief Engineer also routinely made false entries into the Oil Record Book to cover up the illegal activity. When the ship docked in New York, the U.S. Coast Guard boarded and conducted a routine investigation which resulted in the discovery of a “magic pipe” or bypass hose. An $87,500 reward was given to a whistleblower that reported the violations.

2004

04-CR-01728

The M/V Katerina, a Maltese-flagged bulk cargo ship, was operated by DST Shipping, a Greek company. In September 2004, the vessel arrived in California and three whistleblowers wrote letters to the U.S. Coast Guard describing the illegal bypass system used to dump oily water into the ocean. They also drew a diagram about how the bypass system operated. Another whistleblower, the cook on the vessel, also wrote a letter at the request of the other whistleblowers describing the illegal activities. Defendants pleaded guilty and were sentenced to pay $1 million. A total of $250,000 was paid to the four Filipino whistleblowers.

3:04-CR-00531

Defendant is a transportation facilitation company headquartered in Japan. On one of the vessels owned and managed by the Defendant, M/V Cygnus, a Panamanian flagged ship weighing 44,356 gross tons, a crew member reported to U.S. authorities that oily wastes were illegally discharged overboard through a bypass hose. The whistleblower said proof existed by looking in the Manned Zero Checklist. Defendants pled guilty to failing to maintain an Oil Record Book. Defendants were fined $335,000 and award a whistleblower $90,000.

2:04-CR-00060

A $2,100,000.00 reward was given to a whistleblower that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

1:04-CR-20072

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Sabine Transportation pled guilty to eight counts of illegally dumping waste materials, including oily water, contaminated grain, and plastics; and for failing to maintain the Oil Record Book. The company had to pay a $2 million penalty. In September 2004, the chief officer pled guilty to conspiracy and violations of the Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships.

The whistleblowers were two crew members aboard the S.S. Trinity who informed the U.S. Coast Guard that thousands of gallons of contaminated diesel fuel had been illegally discharged from that vessel. Similarly, another whistleblower was a crew member aboard the S.S. Juneau who informed the U.S. Coast Guard that hundreds of tons of diesel contaminated wheat had been illegally discharged overboard. These whistleblowers were awarded a total of $1 million for reporting MARPOL and Act to Prevent Pollution on Ships violations.

2003

3:03-CR-00506

The Fairmont Shipping Ltd., was charged with violations of oil pollution prevention regulations. A $225,000 reward was paid to a whistleblower that reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

3:03-CR-00506

Defendants pled guilty to a violation of oil pollution prevention regulations and sentenced to four years probation and a fine of $450,000. An $225,000 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

3:03-CR-05765

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

A $300,000 reward was paid to two crew members who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships. The whistleblower reported to the Coast Guard a note and a diagram detailing the use of an oil bypass system. (See diagram drawn by the whistleblower, U.S. Department of Justice).

2002

1:02-CR-20631

$250,000 paid to a crew member who reported violations of MARPOL Convention Laws and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships Worker reported: Unauthorized discharge of oil contaminated bilge waste, an inadequate OWS system and a false Oil Record Book.

2000

1:00-CR-00318

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

D/S Progress, a Danish shipping company, was sentenced to pay a $250,000 criminal fine for conspiring to conceal a hazardous leak in the hull of the Freja Jutlandic, an oil tanker which first arrived in Baltimore on March 22, 2000. D/S failed to report emergency discharges to save the ship and presented false Oil Record Book books to the U.S. Coast Guard. Two whistleblowers who secretly wrote the Coast Guard a note detailing the illegal activity were awarded $125,000 (See image from the U.S. Department of Justice).

1998

98-CR-0108

Defendants were a U.S. operator of the cruise ship M/V Rotterdam and made cruises in Alaskan and Canadian waters. They illegally discharged bilge water without use of the Oil Water Separator. An engineer on board the ship refused a order to directly discharge overboard and reported to U.S. Coast Guard that the Oily Water Separator on the ship was often not operational and, despite crew being aware of this, no repairs were ordered. Defendants violated two counts of failing to keep an accurate Oil Record Book and illegally bypassing the Oily Water Separator. They were fined $2,000,000, of which $1,000,000 was to be paid to the National Park Foundation. A $500,000 reward paid to a whistleblower.

1997

1:97-CR-00694

APPS, Cases under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPs)

Defendants operated the cruise ship, Dolphin Cruise Lines, Inc., who illegally dumped garbage bags into the sea near the Florida Keys. Defendants pled guilty to two counts of knowingly discharging plastic bags filled with garbage into the sea and one count of negligently discharging harmful quantities of oil into the water of the contiguous zone. Defendants were sentenced to five years probation and a fine of $275,000. A $25,000 reward was paid to two whistleblowers.

1994

8:94-CR-00245

A $75,000 reward was given to whistleblowers that reported violations of the MARPOL Convention Acts and the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships.

Docket

2:94-cr-00383

A whistleblower was awarded $128,000 after the U.S.-headquartered Crescent Ship Services was charged under the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS).

1993

0:93-CR-06058

Defendants pled guilty to Count 1 of knowingly discharged plastic bags filled with garbage into the sea and had to pay a fine of $500,000. A reward of $250,000 was paid to a whistleblower.

Docket